Kimberly Wiefling

Kimberly Wiefling helps individuals, teams and organizations achieve what SEEMS impossible, but is merely difficult. How? By turning managers into leaders and groups of people into real teams through her unique "WorkShocks" - highly engaging, experiential, interactive "Learning Laboratories" where meaningful positive change happens. DEEP EXPERIENCE with GLOBAL COMPANIES: Kimberly has worked all over the US, Europe and Asia, traveling to Japan over 100 times, to work with culturally diverse employees of globalizing Japanese companies. Her superpower is bringing people with diverse backgrounds, cultures & styles together, across borders and boundaries of every kind, to achieve what none could do alone. See details of her work at Silicon Valley Alliances. Kimberly’s first book, Scrappy Project Management, was also published in Japanese by the #1 business publisher in Japan, Nikkei Business Press. She has edited and co-authored an additional 6 books in the “Scrappy Guides” series, and dozens of blogs. Her mentor, Dr. Edgar Schein, wrote the foreword to her new book “Inspired Organizational Cultures – Discover Your DNA, Engage Your People, and Design Your Future”, which was published in a dual English/Japanese format in March of 2018.

From Mentor to Colleague

Some mentoring relationships last a single meeting, but others last a lifetime. Sometimes a mentoring relationship will turn into a long term relationship. (No, I don’t mean that you sleep with your mentor, or marry them.) I mean that they will come to value and enjoy the mentoring relationship as much as you do. This has happened in several of my mentoring relationships. Because we enjoyed our mentoring sessions so much we continued them beyond the point where I was seeking advice and guidance from them. Eventually they started to ask me for advice.

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Mentoring Circles – Better Leveraging a Mentor’s Time

If you’d like to benefit from mentoring from an expert who’s truly extraordinary, but you feel a bit daunted by their presence, consider gathering two or three people who’d like to share the journey with you. While you might like to keep them all to yourself, having a bigger audience could increase your chances of landing a highly skillful mentor, make the experience less awkward, and you might also learn a lot from the other people in your mentoring circle.

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It’s Just Lunch – Asking an Executive to Mentor You

Some of the best mentoring I’ve ever received is from executives. Ask your executives to spend some time sharing their vision with you. Here’s how: “Jared, I’ve been working here for just about 6 months, and I really like the way you’re leading this division. My manager has shared your strategic plan with our team, and I’ve read all of your messages about our direction, but I’d love to hear your vision from you directly. Would you be willing to spend 15 minutes or so over a cup of coffee sharing your view of our future with me? I promised I’ll make it worth your while by making sure my work is aligned with the direction you’re setting.”

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